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federal revenues should be changed, deficits, public debt and debt held by the public. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the following members of my budget committee staff be granted full floor access for the duration of the consideration of s. con. res. -- john rider and rick jones. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: finally, mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the period of debate for economic goals and policy under section 305-b of the congressional budget act occur on march 21 at a time to be determined by the two managers. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: thank you, mr. president. we are now on the floor of the senate with the budget. i want to thank my counterpart, mr. sessions, for all his work and his staff's work and my staff's to get us to the point here that we are debating this bill and this amendment. senator sessions has been very gracious in working with us. we have gotten to this. we obviously have differences of opinion, but i want to commend
. this is something that every family in america is asking us to focus on. number two, we need to tackle our deficit and debt fairly and responsibly. as democrats, we understand that is a responsibility that we bear today and we do it in this budget. and number three, we need to keep the promises we made as a nation to our seniors and our families and our communities. many who have struggled so much over the last few years and are counting on us to be there for them again now. mr. president, we'll be hearing a lot more about all these principles today and we're going to discuss the stark contrast between the budget that is expected to move in the house of representatives today and the plan and path forward that we have put forward here in the senate as democrats. mr. president, i will yield to senator sessions for his opening remarks, and we will continue this debate throughout the day. mr. sessions: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from alabama. mr. sessions: i thank the chair and would express my appreciation to senator murray for her leadership and who are courtesy and her skill
deficits with no end in sight doesn't lead to prosperity, doesn't lead to growth. it leads to financial ruin. i'm also the father of four great kids, two in college and two in high school. they know that as a family they have to plan ahead for the future. we need to create a budget and then live within our means. these are the same principles that my parents past down to me. -- passed down to me. these are the values that montana's families live by each and every day. those values are exemplified in montana's own state legislature. we're the only constitutionally -- where the only constitutionally required duletty is passing a budget. in -- duty is passing a budget. in fact, when they adjourn in a little over a montana, they will have given montana a balanced budget, just like they did last year and the year before and the year before that. it seems simple -- live within your means, spend no more than you take in, but it's not so easy here in washington. right now we are presented with two very different visions for our country, two visions that will lead to two very different outcomes
through a state where wisconsin had faced a multibillion dollar budget deficit, we were having double-digit tax increases, and we saw some of the record job loss that we've seen in the past. so what did we do? we came in and took that deficit, $3.6 billion, and today it's nearly half a billion dollar surplus. we took up -- [applause] we took a state where taxes had gone up, and we not only lowered the overall tax burden for the first time in years, property taxes on a median value home had gone town in each of the last two years. [applause] and when it comes, and when it comes to jobs under my predecessor's term, wisconsin had lost 133,000 jobs, and back in 2010 a survey showed just 10% of our employers thought we were headed in the right direction. today we're gaining jobs and 93% of our employers say wisconsin is heading in the right direction. we can lead with an optimistic message. [applause] simply put, we showed in our election that when people realized the debate was between who do you want in charge, the big government special interests n this case the employee unions, or do y
reasonable. but if you unpack it, you find out that first of all, in this so-called billion dollar deficit, which of course is the press release deficit, it always changes later on. the actual amount of money this will cost, especially, if it's done correctly, which god forbid they've never done anything correctly before in terms of school closings. this will cost almost a billion dollars itself. so i don't believe any of this. rahm emanuel doesn't know the truth if it would slap him in the face. this is a military style campaign. school closings are based on closing military bases. it's also based on information coming from an unaccredited superintendent organization. but let me just say this -- in th they. >> they say these are poorly performing schools. they're not going to have to travel more than a mile to reach their new school. and any one traveling over an extra.8 of a mile will be bussed. so they're trying to -- >> you're also spending more money. and, again, they started out this conversation when they said they had to close schools by underutilization. they said we're not lookin
decade. and $100 billion in stimulus spending. and would do little to cut spending or the deficit. four democrats mark pryor of arkansas, kay haigen of north carolina, mark baggich of alaska and max bachus of montana all up for reelection in november joined senate republicans who voted against it. even though the margin was close senate leaders were praising colleagues for a job well done. >> i know everyone is exhausted. and you may not feel it at the moment but this is one of the senate's finest days in recent years and i commend everyone who has participated in this extraordinary debate. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. average vote 37 amendments we have done twice as many. doing this has been herculean feat. >> harris: next the senate must reconcile the budget with a plan passed by republicans. now, context showing how differently the plans would deal with the economy. the senate plan calls for $46.5 trillion in spending, nearly $5 trillion more than the house plan and more revenue an additional $1 b
's a financial transsanction, the with tax and getting return it helps with the deficit. the second help to buy hasn't been seen before in the country. whep families whoment to mortgage for any home they are buying but cannot begin to afford the deposit. we offer a new mortgage guarantee. helping them to provide more mortgages to people who can't afford a big deposit. the guaranteed mortgages available to homeowners subject to the usual check on responsible lending. using the government balance sheet we will dramatically increase their availability. we have worked with some of the biggest mortgage lenders to get it right. and we're offering guarantees to support 130 billion pounds worth much mortgages. and will be available from the start of 2014 and run for three years and a future government need the -- policy committee if they want to extend it. help tow buy is a dramatic intervention to get the housing market moving for enoughly built housing. government will put up a fifth of the cost. and anyone affording a mortgage but not a big dpe deposit. it will help you buy your own home. in the buc
of the simpson-bowles plan. the plan reduced the deficit through the balance approach that clued additional targets cuts and also revenue from closing a lot of the special interest tax breaks for very wealthy people, tax breaks which mitt romney and paul ryan talked been on the campaign trail. >> neil: they were without raising the overall rate. now we have the rates raised. so republicans talk of a need for a trigger. they might go along with this tax break stuff and all their closing the loopholes, that they did agree it's sort of wasting time and money and the tax code, but you guys have then got to, as part of the trigger, agree simultaneously to these cuts you talked about. what do you make of that? >> well, first of all, the difference is republicans have never said they're willing to close some of those tax loopholes for the purpose of reducing the deficit. which is what the bipartisan -- >> neil: i got a couple on you. i suspect no angel in the ranks of either party. but they did say that they would be open to closing these loopholes but without this being the only negotiating point
trillion in new taxes. the government would still be in a deficit after ten years. senator patty murray argues the plan creates jobs and economic growth but, of course, during the process, patience did run thin. >> madam president, madam president, madam president. >> senate will come to order. >> madam president, the senate is not in order. i flow's a lot of march madness going on. we would like to keep it calm on the floor so that senators can be heard. >> reporter: the white house recently passed -- excuse me, the house recently passed the ryan budget plan which includes a $4.6 trillion deficit reduction over the next decade. these budget plans are resolutions are not bills. this week, congress did pass a continuing resolution bill which actually funds the government for the next six months. we did hear from white house press secretary jay carney, responding to today's news in a statement and reading, in part, "like the president's plan, the senate budget cuts wasteful spending, makes tough choices to strengthen entitlements and eliminates special tax breaks and loopholes for the wea
and deficit. i voted against the solution for the fiscal cliff because the headlines would say the fiscal cliff is avoided, and there were three elements. we did not avoid any of them. we raise taxes on every american. we put sequestration down the road and we did zero on deficit problems. we are facing total economic chaos if we are not careful. host: republican caller. pennsylvania. caller: in response to the fiscal cliff, i find him very -- i do not know, i do not believe what he is saying. he is talking about a fiscal cliff, but you want us to accept the people here illegally and give them something they have not earned. i do not understand what republicans are doing. i am a conservative. i do not want amnesty. i do not want them here. host: you might have missed what the congressman said earlier. i will let him respond. guest: what she is saying is she does not want amnesty, and under president bush he had a strong amnesty plan and i said i would not back it. total amnesty like the one president reagan did will cause a lot of problems here and i think we need the workers. obviously,
for that, because we had the great recession, and we needed to engage in some deficit spending to offset that demand contraction. historically the debt goes up in periods like this. in world war ii, it breached 100%, then a few years later it was 50%. the debt is expected to start coming down within a few years. over the long term, there are real pressures on the debt through health care costs. that's what i would tell mr. penny. >> excellent. that's very helpful. josh, the president last week was secured on the right for suggesting there was no dead crisis in american. later in the week this is what speaker boehner and paul ryan had to say. take a listen. >> is he right, that we don't have an immediate crisis. >> we do not have an immediate debt crisis. >> we do not have a debt crisis right now, but we see it's coming. it's irrefutably happening. >> what are they doing by repeatedly fanning into flame the notion of a debt crisis, when they themselves when asked directly say exactly what jared said. in the immediate short term, it is not a pressing issue. >> it's because it's instrumenta
. it never balances. never comes close to balancing. it claims that it reduces the deficit over 10 years by $1.5 trillion. that is not correct. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've been buying ragu for years. [ thinking ] i wonderhat other questionable choices i've made? [ club scene music ] [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. bill: there's a top republican senator now demanding answers from the fbi director after not being briefed on their benghazi investigation for the last six months. four americans died in the assault on the u.s. consulate including our ambassador chris stevens. senator susan collins says she wants some simple questions answered. quote, are any of the suspects believed to be responsible for the deaths of these four americans including ambassador stevens in u.s. or libyan custody? how many suspects in the attacks are still at large? a few other questions after that. virginia republican congressman frank wolf has been fighting for answers in benghazi. he is our guest now. sir, good morning,
that trying dollars deficit can quickly spin out of control because interest rates growth and people don't want to borrow going to get. if interest rates go up, the united states is even worse here the deficit will go up even more. what is already in the current situation will spin out of control very easily like we've seen happen in greece and other countries. that want to talk about the impact of obama's views on the. another area where people are educated. it can make a difference just like educating people with regards to the deficits were facing and that deficit supposedly help the economy. before i get into this, we both taught at the university of chicago law school. the first time i met him i introduced myself and say you are the kind of guy. as idiotic as silk. and i had no he would help me out with the city of chicago since i'd heard that. they said maybe we can get together for lunch sometime. but he kind of wrinkled his face, turned his back to me and walked away and that was the end of our first conversation. i have to say rinne two and 20 other times and it's pretty much th
dollar deficits, no growth, which is true, and we keep having these states with higher taxes and destroying output, it could happen here. it terrifies me. >> what would trigger it would be sharply higher interest rates when people -- in order to buy our debt. not talking about just a few points here but dramatically higher interest rates where it's impossible for us to pay our entire debt load. then becomes a point where we reach financial collapse. >> neil: when people don't trust their financial institution. but when it's your bank bank, your passbook savings account, that is called into question, that galvanizes. then what? >> here's the thing, neil. that almost happened in the past and i think hank paulsen and bernanke and the leadership -- recappallizing the banks was the way to go. in these countries, the banking system is the government. they're so intertwined. we're not there but we're getting there. and remember, once the government -- once they're questions about the sovereign -- sanctity of the dollar, everything falls because our banking system is aligned with our
, immigration and guns and what to do about the deficit. >> don't forget two other prominent spokes people, the president and vice president. they care a lot about it and have been quiet of late. i expect to see a big push between of two of them before the vote. >> the lack of courage in the united states is asstountounast. >> it's amazing. >> no one is coming to take your gun. no one is coming to take your gun. >> it's amazing. it's amazing. when you look at the fact that we are talking about a simple thing like background checks. people are dying every day. a baby killed in -- >> in pennsylvania. >> in brunswick, georgia. we are arguing about background checks is almost ununbelievable. surreal. >> background checks have 90% of support among the american people last check. >>> senator bob casey of pennsylvania will join us on the set coming up and leigh gallagher and representative rick mulvaney will weigh in. our good friend michael hainey will have a preview of the "gq" magazine. bill karins, what is up? >> schoolhouse are cancelled around baltimore and washington, d.c. a lot of delays.
, you've heard about the fracking but further into that, i think that the trade deficit for the u.s., two to three years from now is going to go from deficit to surplus. we haven't had a surplus since 1975. secondly, global trade, global trade is actually very good for the u.s. because it grows the global economy. for instance, there's a new panama canal that is going to really bowler is it the south belt trade from china to other emerging markets. technology is always, we're looking in the technology, there is something called big beta. this is taking technology from cost controls to revenue enhancement. we coined our own pivot. per re, indsmeesh that, vietnam, oman and turkey. tracy: what worries you the most right now? >> europe. i'm very concerned that cyprus is not by itself a big deal but they keep changing the rules of the game and the financial system is very precarious right now in europe. the u.s. is fine. and i'm just wondering how long can europe, we're in the third, they're in the third recession in five years, how long can they not grow? all the debt forgiveness in t
you need to deal with it budgets and deficits and you need to keep growth going. here is what i saw over the weekend. recession in greece which is a actually a depression if you line it up against the u.s. great depression in 1929 it looks a lot a like in terms of how much unemployment there send a how much the economy was contracted. greece is having our great depression of the late 1920s. >> wow. >>> moving on to washington now. president obama's renewed push for a grand bargain may be showing some early signs of paying off, at least with one top republican. senator bob corker of tennessee says he could envision raising tax revenue if democrats embrace big changes to medicare and social security. he is at odds with other members of his party including house speaker john boehner who is ruling out the prospect of any new taxes. >> i think, by the way, there is a chance on a deal. i know the president is saying the right things and we have an opportunity over the next four to five months. i think republicans, if they saw true entitlement reform would be glad to look at tax reform tha
ryan's balanced budget for 2014. all democrats and 10 republicans voting no. it would cut the deficit by $4.5 million. the plan will likely never become law because of opposition. >>> politicians are scrambling to restructure the most troubled bank. people are rushing to get cash from atms and the bank put a cap on daily withdrawals. they have given them till monday to raise the money they need to secure a bill out and if they don't have the money by the deadline the european central bank will cut off its emergency support which would throw them into financial chaos. the turmoil had an effect on wall street today. the dow is down 90 to 14,421. the nasdaq is down 31 at 3,222. the s&p is down 12 to 1,545. unexpected weak sales resulted from oracle also factored in. >>> the prime minister of australia apologized to unwed mothers. >> she spoke before hundreds of people, many who were in tears. she pledged $5 million to help reunite mothers with children taken from them decades ago. it was thought to be in the best interest of the children. >>> a group is coming out in support of gay marri
it in for the dunk to cut the deficit to one. st. louis was just too much. cody ellis drains the three to give st. louis a six-point lead. they go on to win 62-56. so st. louis plan to watch the ncaa selection at the airport but they ran into traffic so they settled for watching it at a best buy in new jersey. look, it comes with comedy la-z-boys. don't expect to see defending champion kentucky, they were left out of the big dance. we start in the midwest where louisville claim the top 87 all seed in the tournament. should they win they'll face the winner of the colorado state versus missouri game. in the west, gonzaga got the number one seed but they've got a tough road. they would face the winner of the pitt versus wichita state game in the second round. on the other side of the bracket kansas took the top seed in the south but they have a date with either unc or villanova should they advance to the round of 32. in the east, indiana starts as the top seed. it's second seed miami that has a lot of people talking. they'll face pacific in the opening round. then vegas likes louisville to take the
that passed through the senate really echos what president obama would like to see in terms of deficit reduction but the problem, of course, is when you match up is the senate bill with the house bill. the senate bill calls for deficit reduction through increasing taxes and spending cuts and, of course, the house bill calls for steep cuts in balancing the budget within ten years. of course, some revisions to medicare as well. a lot of differences and we have another deadline coming up. the debt ceiling will have to be revisited this summer, alex. >> looking forward to that. >> reporter: yeah, we all are. >> thank you very much, kristen welker. >>> joining me right now, andy sullivan and ann palmer. ann, i'll begin with you. the president is back from the middle east. the reviews are out there. how are you getting the word in terms of how he was perceived? >> i think one of the key things you can look at is what the israeli press put out in the days following his first steps and throughout the entire visit and it was a resounding applause. he got very good praise from them. obviously fr
that the obama care would be deficit-neutral and control costs i think has turned out to be a charade. if you look at the longer term projections it looks especially more unlikely today than it did when they were engaged in the budget that allowed it to pass. what i think is interesting on the political side is how republicans are treating the issue right now. there is a debate inside the republican party whether it's wise to continue talking about obamacare. on one hand you have a group that says in effect this is over, this is done, we should tweak it, try to improve it, do what we can. let's not focus op it because it's in the past and discussion of aweer thety. on the other hand people think talk about it all the time because implementation is proving difficult and it will be more difficult as we go along to the republicans' benefit. >> bret: the second group of republicans believe the thing could crater. it could just not work. >> correct. that is a possibility. i think that the comment we just heard, there are thousands of pages of regulation that people haven't read is true. i don't ca
the deficit, more stimulus and spending. we are in the funny process where we will wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. any issue you have heard your callers call in and complain --ut, we might see today drone strikes against u.s. citizens, taxes, repealing healthcare -- they might all come up, but it is adding to a nonbinding budget resolution, so it is interesting and it might give people clues. host: a headline in your sayscation, "the hill," the senate is poised to pass a budget. guest: i think democrats will control the process and get it passed. .hey have a small window they can afford five democrats to not vote for it and still pass it, and in that case you would need vice president joe biden to break the time. -- the thai. .- tie there is pent-up frustration on the republican side about no real budget debate over four years. once it is passed, a lot of people will feel better. democrats will say we passed a budget, republicans get to complain about the budget month but from there it is hard to see how the senate budget reconciles with the house bu
saying we want a lot more spending, most of it paid for by deficit this year and next. we'll see a lot of defectses from the democrat budget resolution. we saw a vote yesterday in the senate which was, you talked with stuart varney about. repealing the medical device tax. we're likely to see a lot of defects from the white house and the democratic leadership proposal to have a lot more spending in year and coming years. we saw the opening mark of that yesterday. bill: peter cottontail still on the schedule for the 1st of april. we'll bring you back and we'll continue this little discussion about what's right and what's not given the budget crunch. >> bring back the white house tours. bring back the white house tours. bring back the white house tours. there we go. bill: enjoy austin. see you soon. heather. heather: the clock is ticking as the country is on a verge of collapse. can a deal be reached before there is a i had on people's bank accounts and is this something we could see happen to your bank account? bill: also a scared homeowner, well, you won't believe what they did when a h
the deficit long term. the democrat budget, of course, talks about a big tax hike over ten years of about $1 trillion. republicans say they're not going to do that. they want to roll back obama care. these are the two outside extreme positions. that's where we're at now. going forward can they come together and find some middle ground? >> weigh in on that, lauren. is there really a chance for reconciling these two extreme budgets? >> i think david kind of nailed it here. when it comes to the budgets, they're just a little bit too far, but this budget process isn't a waste of time. i think it's promising that they went through regular order. this is something that the senate hasn't done. they haven't passed a budget this a long time. i think what we'll see is this may open the door to pass some appropriations bilts for 2014 and this could put us on the road for a long-term deficit reduction deal. these are just opening gothss here. >> david, as i look at your article, it focuses on immigration reform and how it's making its way through the senate. where do things stand right now? >> alex, the
without a hint of how it would be possible. without exploding the deficit or dramatically raising taxes on the middle class. this is consistent with what the romney ryan ticket said on the campaign trail last fall. the same issue where they dodged, assembled, and ignored the perfectly reasonable question how is it possible? six months later it's back in the budget but there's still -- but there still is no answer. during the last 40 years there have been only four budgets without deficits. the last three clinton budgets and the one that george bush inherited from bill clinton. in each case taxes as a percentage of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fantasy land budgets are balanced with revenues at 19% of the economy, yet meeting the needs of 78 million more seniors and a infrastructure deficit that is growing as america is falling apart. clearly this is not remotely possible if we are going to enjoy anything like our current quality of life. there is a real world intersection of budget saving opportunities with potential areas of agreement. health care reform is one. b
gone through a state where wisconsin had faced a multibillion $budget deficit. we saw some of the record jobs will we've seen in the past. what did we do? we took that $3.6 billion and -- half a billion surplus. we lowered the overall taxes for the first time in years. taxes on homes have gone down in each of the last two years. [applause] but when it comes to jobs under my predecessors terms wisconsin lost 300,000 jobs and just 10% of our employers were headed in the right direction. today we're gaining jobs and 93% of the employers says that wisconsin is heading in the right direction. we can leave with an optimistic message. simply put in we showed in our election who do you want in charge, the big government or do you want the hard working taxpayers, the hard working taxpayers win out and they will win out over and over again. in america, we need to show an optimistic message that we're not standing with the big businesses of america, we're standing with the hard-working taxpayers and this is the message that can resonate throughout this country. [applause] now, in addi
that cutting the deficit was the most important issue facing the country. why the gap between what voters say that they want and what lawmakers are doing there in washington? >> because the lawmakers who are developing and passing budgets in washington, d.c. are completely out of touch with what most americans want. look, when paul ryan in that foot ang we just saw said that they want to about a the budget and we don't, either he is not listening or purposely evading the truthful we both want a balanced budget. the issue is how do you balance it? democrats believe we should have a solutions based budget that does three things. number one, that it takes a balanced approach to reducing debt. we've got to reduce debt. number two, that is fair to the middle class. their budget is completely unfair to the middle class. number three, that invest in the right priorities. the smart priorities. their budget completely divests. when the times are tough and families are sitting there trying to figure out what cut do we cut going to an expensive restaurant or cut our kids going to college? what this repu
of growth we are spirits as a country collectively would be uplifted again. the best deficit-reduction program is a growing economy and strangely if you see the debate in washington today very little is about economic growth and a lot of it is about what my dad would say, eat your broccoli. it's about the austerity. it's about the toughest things that have to get done. don't get me wrong but they are much easier to get done in the context of high sustained growth where jobs are being created and are of purpose and value for people to be able to pursue their dreams. i have three suggestions i don't think our that partisan. they are not necessarily ideological that if we pause and say we will have the food fight on all the other stuff and there's good things to fight it out, trust me, the we could get to the point that we could have high year sustained growth one would be to create a patriotic policy based on american ingenuity and innovation and north american resources. second, reform the immigration system and move towards something that would be part of the high growth econ
, and lawmakers with 30 seconds think they are run to overhaul the deficit. you have to have a process. now every package we get has been 11th-hour, crafted by the leadership behind closed doors. it concentrates the power in the hands of leadership and takes at away from the rank and file. the give-and-take gets you to a place where i did not get everything i wanted, but i get some of what i want it. everybody does not expect to get 100%. you do not expect that you are going to get 100% adopted. the same is true in congress. they have to reconcile those differences. the only way to do that is still a legitimate process. it has to be bipartisan. somebody is on to say, bipartisanship is not a theory, it is a political necessity. >> i am going to have to ask if we have time for one more question. we have time. you guys are lucky, at least one of you is. >> we will get to a microphone in one second. would you please come up ere. >> i'm a dentist in the san fernando valley dental society. one of the major concerns in this country is the affordable health care act, and there is a lot of concern about t
trillion deficits -- that would be the annual difference between what we bring in and what the government spends -- four in a row more than a trillion dollars -- after more than $1.6 trillion in tax increases, after hundreds of billions of dollars worth of new regulations, our country is mired, we are mired in the longest period of high unemployment since the great depression. that is a direct consequence of this huge debt and our creditors' lack of confidence that we're actually serious about dealing with it. indeed, many workers have simply given up on finding work, which is one reason why our labor force participation rate is now at a 32-year low. unemployment's almost 8% but that doesn't take into account the millions of people who have simply given up looking for work after a long period of unemployment. since june 2009, when the recession officially ended, median household income has fallen by more than $2,400. so instead of treading water, the average american family is seeing their buying power decrease by more than $ 2,400 since 2009. at the same time, they're finding not only ar
federal deficits in five years makes it imprudent to jump in with both feet. consider on tuesday paul endorsed a version of immigration reform that would allow the 11 million or so undocumented immigrants in this country to become legal. the week before he defied the hawks in his party to lead a 13-hour filibuster in protest of the obama admission's secretory over its drone war fare program. >> dan senor, you've been involved in republican presidential primaries lately. sorry about that. how would those issues stack up in new hampshire and iowa and south carolina and florida? >> i think the politics, his politics on pure fiscal issues will have tremendous resonance as his father experienced in some primary states and caucus states. i think what is untested is -- from a -- from a political standpoint is his position on foreign policy. his father never really broke through on the neoisolationist politics at the grassroots level beyond a narrow segment of the electorate. rand who i've spent time talking about these issues is much salvier than his father. >> his father blamed in effect u.
for tax revenue to help reduce the deficit. it calls for more spending. we are in the funny process where today, we will wrap up beforehand 50 hours of debate and start the unlimited amendment process. any issue that you have heard complaints about, we might see votes on today. droneld be stuff like strikes against u.s. citizens, it could be taxes and repealing healthcare. the point to remember, this is adding on to a budget resolution. it is interesting and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. host: the headline says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect it to pass? guest: we do expect it to pass. behink the democrats will able to control the process and get it to pass. they have a small window. you would need vice president biden to come down and break the tie. the significance is, this is the result -- there is a lot of pent up frustration on the republican side. that is why we might see a late night tonight and into the morning. once it is passed, i think a lot of people will feel better and
-income americans to reduce the deficit. so now, finally, senate democrats feel that they can go ahead and echo that position. that's change. >> an narc the president is expected to release the white house budget in april. what kind of compromises, if any, can we expect to see there? >> i think he is going to kind of come up and say the same things that he has been saying. we will look at the changes he will make to the entitlement program. the republicans saying they will not raise tax and what the democrats might do on entitlement reforms if they can find any kind of common ground that would be possible there. >> bill schneider, anna palmer, stick around. we would like to come back to you later in the hour, if that's okay with you. >> sure. >> thanks. >>> could bill clinton be talking out of both sides of his mouth? the report that suggests escorting two candidates for the same office. we will talk about that. >>> first though, kristen cinema is here, very excited about being here. we just had a 15-minute conversation to make up. we can't talk about that. we can talk immigration, marriage equ
-term debt and recovered the budget deficit. detroit is the largest u.s. city ever put under state control. those are your headlines. i am lauren reed. back to connell. connell: a move lower in stocks. we have noticed some of the french banks. they are all down. dagen: a snowstorm that dumped as much as 2 feet in the northwest. connell: i would rather be over in cyprus. >> good morning. we are tracking it again. parts of illinois being hit with as much as 15 inches of snow. it is as far west as parts of indiana. the highest snowfall totals should be a foot of snow. we do have winter storm warnings in effect. it is because of the wind and snowfall amounts. we actually have been seeing some delays. they are about an hour or so. you could see four-6 inches of snow out here. the central appellations and most of these warnings should expire by tomorrow. that is what we think the storm system will pull out of the northeast leaving behind some quieter conditions. connell: that sounds, well, all right. dagen: tom kloza is coming up with a big addiction on gasoline prices. he says you will save mon
's what counts. not if you happen to have a little deficit, and in fact michael steele went on to say when we were handing out checks i don't believe reince priebus complaining. >> so reince is just being silly. and i understand he wasn't complaining about debt and concerned about debt when i was write checks to wisconsin when he was chairman and he wanted to win the legislature and governor which they did and they were all on board about going into debt to win. >> when did republicans turn into democrats. it's all overshadowed and sabotaged by infighting. >> bill: this is the circular firing squad for which republicans are famous. grace nap ol 'tano will be with here today, neil king, and of course you'll be with us too throughout the morning, and mike i will bloomberg is on the warpath again. but first. >> announcer: this the "full court press." >> on this tuesday overhead lines making news michael jackson's family is suing the entertainment company that sponsored the last tour. tmz reports that -- >> 2011? >> bill: come. come on. >> -- the new lawsuit they ar
the rate. we say, let's take some of that revenue to help reduce the deficit, combined with other targeted cuts. >> be more specific for me. when you talk about tax loopholes and the very wealthy. which specific loopholes and what is very wealthy? >> sure, sure, these are, when you're in the highest tax bracket, you're in the 39% tax bracket when you get a deduction, whatever it may be for, you get 39 cents worth of deduction. whereas somebody who is in the 28% tax bracket only gets 28 cents deduction for that particular deduction. so what we're saying and this is similar to a proposal the president's put forward, is that for folks who are in that very high bracket, the 39% bracket, the value of your deductions will be limited to about 28% which is what the value of deductions is for a middle income taxpayer. >> so ultimately, the budget that you have there and i just read the little chunk of it, you have more revenue increases than cuts, right? >> within, within this particular budget, but if you look, soledad, at the two-year period of reduction we've been engaged in, which is -- include
-point deficit to beat the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. they have now won 24 games in a row. >> bill: can you imagine being down 27. >> i mean that's -- in the third quarter being down that much is daunting. but it shows just how dominant lebron james is, when he is ready to turn it on, he turns it on, and there is no stopping him. which is different than he used to be. now he is a monster. >> bill: you have got it. we have a great lineup for you for the rest of the program, congress woman judy chu from southern california will be joining us as well as a friend of bill from the "huffington post" and joe, our own foreign policy guru who will bring us up to date on what the president is up to in the middle east and his syria in fact use chemical weapons as has been reported. and the republican party engaged in a sort of a civil war. we'll get into that, but first -- >> announcer: this is the "full court press." >> espn releasing president obama's complete march madness yesterday as the men's tournament gets underway today. number one louisville, indiana, ohio state, an
, thankfully. >>> facing a $1 billion deficit, chicago public school system is making some really big changes. ceo barbara byrd bennett says the district's underutilized skols will be closed. they have not said how many schools are expected to close but opponents say they unfairly target minorities. >>> 24 and counting for the miami heat. but it was not easy. it hasn't been easy the last few games. lebron james and company came back from 27 points down in the third. >> can you believe that? >> beat his old team, the cleveland cavaliers 98-95. a triple-double. 12 boards, 10 assists. the heat are now within nine games of the nba record for consecutive wins held by the '71-'72 los angeles lakers. >> do you think they'll do it? >> no. they almost blew it against the celtics, almost blew it against the cavs. they are the best team i've seen in years. i don't think they should ever lose necessarily but that's a lot of games to win in a row. >> i can't believe they were down that much and came back. >> i can't believe you can do that every night. >> i think they're doing it on purpose. >>> recovered
for some tax revenue to help reduce the deficit, calls for some more stimulus, more spending that way. and we're in this funny process where today we will wrap up, i think a little beforehand technically, but we'll wrap up 50 hours of debate and then start the unlimited amendment process. basically, any issue you've ever heard your callers call in and complain about we might see votes on today. it could be stuff like drone strikes against u.s. citizens, and it could be taxes and repealing health care and all these different issues that may come up. the point to remember, though, is this is all adding on to a nonbinding budget resolution. so it's interesting, and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. but it's not binding right away. >> host: headline in your publication, "the hill," says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect this to pass, and what's the significance? where does it go from here? >> guest: we do expect it. i think the democrats will be able to control the process and get it passe
project 1 billion dollar deficit next year. the closures will save chicago $560 million the next decade. >> whether you do this, mike, in chamucla, florida, or chicago, illinois, this is always excruciating tough for parents and kids, but you got to do it if you're going to keep the budget. >> you have to do it to same some semblance of sanity for a big city like that but you get into where are the displaced kids going to go to schools when the schools are closed? are they going to be bussed? most parents would like their kids to go to a neighborhood school and what happens then? that a huge burden for the mayor now. >> totally. sequestration is complicating it even more. we just did a report that head start across the country is facing these exact challenges and cutting school days and not accepting kids and randomly dropping kids from the program and a disadvantage for kids in that economic status. >> you look at the regional and local papers across the country you see endless stories like this. you look at the national programs and turn on the tv news and where is the white house tou
is it doesn't really look like a whole lot. surely not enough to fill our deficit at this point but it is going to bring back the cooler temperatures in the overnight hours with the cloud cover. we will actually see our 0 overnight lows and our morning temperatures come up. low 40s in the forecast tuesday, wednesday, thursday. unsettled weather wednesday and thursday with a bigger storm moving in for the weekend. this second system, or third system i guess we could call it, could bring us scattered showers for saturday and sunday. >>> on tuesday night the sacramento city counsel will consider throwing up a last- second shot to keep the kings from leaving town. the city has struck a daily to build a new $448 million downtown arena, and it would be the largest redevelopment project in sacramento history with up to a million and a half square feet of offices housing shops and a hotel. the city would pay $258 million with most of the money coming from the sale of bonds supported by parking revenues. >> that's part of revitalizing our downtown. that's part of completing the rest of k
. they will take middle-class money. they will take everybody's money in order to pay off the deficit. it's something you have to think about. >> brian: there was a report from somebody in great britain, an authority of some sort who was talking about, given what has happened in sigh plus, if i had money in spain i would get it out. >> no, it's being talked about in other places. in worse of terms of condition, spain is a good one, greece and lots of other places and they are talking about it. you know, at some point maybe they start talking here. what ultimately that means is that jobs will -- you think we have bad unemployment now. you will see unemployment like you've never seen it before. >> gretchen: somebody from your show, celebrity apprentice, a lot of people will be shocked they didn't see it. amarosa and claudia got the hook >> why didn't she bring amarosa back? in all fairness claudia, i have to defend you. if she was brought back it wouldn't matter. you were the project manager and you failed. you have a great future. i'm sorry -- you're fired! >> did you for a second i can't
for this in more ways than one. you think about the deficit, the government doesn't have this kind of cash and people are concerned this isn't necessarily the best use of taxpayer money. in the video, you saw a second ago, people are dressed up as crew members on a starship enterprise, and the government employee version of characters claiming they will boldly go where no government employees have ever gone before. it is funny. but i watched the videos with my producer and we were trying to to figure out the training value and people have similar questions. >> i have been since corrected and am about to burst into a fit of giggles and i inappropriately said it is "gilligan's island," not whatever i said. what is the irs saying about this in. >> they came up with this statement saying it is -- i'm quoting now, no mistaking this video does not reflect the best stewardship of resources, and that video of this type will not be made today. so the irs does say training gener videos in general are cheaper. that would involve some travel. >> okay. zain asher, thank you. >>> honeymoons, they are th
. that's how many chicago schools will be closed because a $1 billion budget deficit. it's not clear how many teachers are lose their jobs, but they will close a bunch of schools. 43,000. that's how many jobs have been lost since j.c. penney -- at j.c. penney since ron johnson became ceo. a new report shows he let the company pay for at least nine executives to get work by two jets, which cost $41 million apiece. nice work if you can get it. mr. kilmeade? >> brian: or if you had it. it's one of the most outrageous stories of the week. one of the most popular pharmacies telling their employees to step on the scale or pay a penalty. cvs wants employees to report their weight, fat and glucose levels to health insurance bosses and if they don't, they get fined $600 a year. it might be legal, but is it fair? steven mitchell is an employment attorney and author of a book, "the employee rights handbook." and john is a professor at a law school. does this sound right to you? >> it's an outrage n my opinion. they're trying to help people's health, but when you impose a penalty on people, that's w
to close the 54 schools in an effort to make a dent in a $1 billion budget deficit, make better use of resources and improve overall education here in the nation's third largest school district. >> i don't think it's going to be good for my kids. >> reporter: the news of the school closings continues to ripple across chicago this morning. >> i'm, just don't know where they're going to go. >> reporter: mayor rahm emmanuel says the closures are necessary after too much money was being spent on maintaining underutilized school buildings saying "by consolidating these schools, chicago public schools can focus on safely getting every child into a better performing school. like school systems in new york and philadelphia, where schools are being closed, chicago must make tough choices." a number of teachers may lose their jobs as a result of the closings. karen lewis. of the teachers' union lashed out at emmanuel. >> our mayor, who is away on a ski trip, drops this information right before spring break. it's the ultimate bullying job. mayor rahm emmanuel should be ashamed of himself. >> r
of all of our problems that were caused because of the sequester and still do deficit reduction, get our budget toward balance. and if that happens, this sequester will end. not only for the f.a.a. my friend is right. this is ridiculous. but for the 70,000 children who are being cut out of head start. why isn't there more discussion about that? when we know every dollar invested in a child, in head start, saves $10 because they get that head start in life. and where's the outrage of the h.i.v. -- 421,000 fewer h.i.v. tests? that's a public health emergency when 421,000 people can't get their h.i.v. tests, they don't know if they're h.i.v. positive. they could spread the virus. that's what's happening with this sequester. 10,500 lost teacher jobs. 2,700 will lose title 1 funds. that's a million kids who are getting special reading help because of this sequester. i think we all agree, the sequester is no way to govern. we can get to pay balanced budget without a sequester. we did that under bill clinton. we had a balanced approach. we made investments in our people. we cut out unnecessary
of the problem that we're in as a country in terms of our debt and deficits, we have to have programs that have metrics on them, they have to be followed up, the grants have to be followed, and they need to be held to account. so i hope my colleagues -- i have no hopes of this passing, because most of the colleagues won't actually look at the research that's been done on this, won't look at the effectiveness of it, won't look at the waste, and they'll vote a party-line vote to defeat this amendment. we'll get 45 or 50 votes or 51 or 52. but it'll go down and so consequently real problems that have been oversighted by the permanent subcommittee on investigation, really oversighted by the department of homeland security, the real solutions to problems won't happen because of the way this place is being run. i'd next like to talk about amendment 93. amendment 93 follows a recommendation of the president -- not my recommend day, the president's recommendation. and what this amendment would do is actually take money that has been directed for expired heritage area authorizations that weren't any rec
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